Amar

In Amar (all great achievements require time), the documenter gives us a glimpse in the daily life of a boy that lives in India by following him through his long day. In the description of the documentary, it is said that Amar is a fourteen year old who works two jobs, but still manages to be top of his class. Throughout this film, the videographer makes sure to catch all of these characteristics by showing him working long hours at both jobs, and even showing clips of him during school. The part that really tied it all together, though, was the only speaking scene where he is reciting written English in his classroom while standing in front of his peers. The documenter made good use of silence in this video, in a way, by actually breaking the silence.  Before Amar spoke, I was left with a bit of anticipation. It added mystery, which seemed to be a tactic to keep viewers interested ( it worked by the way). Then, finally, the main idea that the documenter wanted to get across was clear when was finally able to speak English out loud. I think the “hard work pays off” mantra is shown off well by using Amar as an example, which goes hand in hand with the title of the work.

The video is based around nonintervention in Amar’s daily routine, and creates a strong feeling of real experience. This tells me that the mode of representation for this piece is observational, according to Bill Nichols, author of Representing Reality, which touches upon this and other types of documentary modes of representation.

 

For more about these modes of representation, check the link below:

http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/dewitt18/e569sld/modesrepresentation.htm

 

I think this mode works wonders for this film, because it shows the true, gritty work this boy goes through every day and the reward he receives for sticking it out, simply through following him around for a day. The observational mode shows that the footage is, in a sense, raw and a lot less influenced by the director than other modes might be, and that is something crucial to making this piece work.

 

 

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